Just out:

▪ Blackmore, S., and Troscianko, E.T. (2018). Consciousness: An introduction. 3rd edition. London: Routledge. Read more here.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2018). Literary reading and eating disorders: Survey evidence of therapeutic help and harm. Journal of Eating Disorders, 6, 8. Open-access full text here.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2018). Fiction-reading for good or ill: Eating disorders, interpretation, and the case for creative bibliotherapy research. Medical Humanities, online first. Abstract here.

Troscianko, E.T., and Bray, R. (June-July 2018). Guest blog series for The Early Career Blog (Oxford, Cambridge, and Imperial) on resilience and academia, Post #1: Resilience: Does academia complement or conflict with who you are? (9 June)


Monograph:

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2014). Kafka’s cognitive realism. London: Routledge.

Sets out the value of cognitive realism – a convergence between cognitive faculties as they operate in readers’ minds and are evoked in literary texts – for the theoretical and empirical study of literature, taking Kafka’s evocations of vision, imagination, and emotion as the case study. Appraised in Modern Language Review 110(4) as an ‘engagingly written interdisciplinary study’ which presents its main thesis with ‘exemplary clarity’, and makes ‘an important contribution to this area of Kafka studies’.


Co-authored textbook:

▪ Blackmore, S., and Troscianko, E.T. (2018). Consciousness: An introduction. 3rd edition. London: Routledge. (Google Books preview (ebook version) here; Amazon.co.uk page here.)

In this major collaboration with my mother, Sue Blackmore, I’ve taken the lead on fully restructuring and generating much new material for the third edition of the world’s only textbook on the mystery of consciousness, embracing psychology, philosophy, neuroscience, and touching on many other fields. (My brother Jolyon Troscianko also created the wonderful illustrations!) On 


Edited book:

▪ Burke, M., and Troscianko, E.T. (Eds) (2017). Cognitive literary science: Dialogues between literature and cognition. New York: Oxford University Press. (Google Books preview  here; Amazon.co.uk page here.)

Showcases the three main variations on cognitive literary science, highlighting the potential for the literary to contribute to the scientific as well as vice versa.


 Co-edited special issue:

Burke, M., and Troscianko, E.T. (Eds) (2013). Explorations in cognitive literary science. Special issue, Journal of Literary Semantics, 42(2).

Brings together contributions demonstrating the potential for disciplinary reciprocity in the field of cognitive literary science.


Online bibliography:

▪ Lead author, Cognitive Humanities annotated bibliography

A selection of chapters and articles on a wide range of cognitive topics, to help literary scholars interested in cognitive approaches orientate themselves in existing scientific and cognitive-humanities research


Popular nonfiction:

▪ Hart-Davis, A., and Troscianko, E. (2006). Taking the piss: A potted history of pee. Stroud: Chalford.

Everything you never knew you needed to know about urine, from chemistry to Warhol to reindeer to army rations.

▪ Hart-Davis, A., and Troscianko, E. (2002). Henry Winstanley and the Eddystone lighthouse. Stroud: Sutton.

A tragic tale of engineering and hubris, centred on the first lighthouse ever to be built on a rock in the open sea.


Refereed journal articles:

(Full-text pre-publication versions of most of my journal papers are available on the Oxford University Research Archive here and via ResearchGate here.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2018). Literary reading and eating disorders: Survey evidence of therapeutic help and harm. Journal of Eating Disorders, 6, 8.

Presents the findings from the major online survey conducted with Beat, which offer detailed self-report evidence of the links between reading and mental health from nearly 900 respondents, and contradict received wisdom about the types of literary text likely to be most therapeutically beneficial.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2018). Fiction-reading for good or ill: Eating disorders, interpretation and the case for creative-bibliotherapy research. Medical Humanities, online first 21 April.

Makes the broader argument for bringing research on eating disorders and on (literary) interpretation into dialogue, highlighting how much is assumed and how little really known.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2014). First-person and second-generation perspectives on starvation in Kafka’s ‘Ein Hungerkünstler’. In M. Caracciolo and K. Kukkonen (Eds), ‘Cognitive literary study: Second-generation approaches’. Special issue, Style, 48(3), 331-348.

Argues for the importance of acknowledging both personal experience and embodiment in understanding the meanings and effects of Kafka’s short story about a man who fasts to death for others’ entertainment.

▪ Troscianko, E.T.  (2014). Reading Kafka enactively. In T. Cave, K. Kukkonen, and O. Smith (Eds), ‘Reading literature cognitively’. Special issue, Paragraph, 37, 15-31.

Sets out the importance of understanding cognition as enactive (i.e. constituted by physical interaction between embodied minds and environments) for appreciating the effects of Kafka’s novel Der Proceß (The Trial) in the contexts of vision and imagination, language, and emotion.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2013). Reading imaginatively: The imagination in cognitive science and cognitive literary studies. In M. Burke and E.T. Troscianko (Eds), ‘Explorations in cognitive literary science’. Special issue, Journal of Literary Semantics, 42(2), 181-198.

Shows how empirical findings on literary reading can and should inform the scientific study of mental imagery.

▪ Burke, Michael, and Emily T. Troscianko. (2013). Mind, brain, and literature: A Dialogue on what the humanities might offer the cognitive sciences. In M. Burke and E.T. Troscianko (Eds), ‘Explorations in Cognitive Literary Science’. Special issue, Journal of Literary Semantics, 42, 141-148.

Introduces the special issue with reasons why the study of literature is important to the study of the mind.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2013). Cognitive realism and memory in Proust’s madeleine episode. Memory Studies, 6, 437-456.

Investigates the divergences and discrepancies between the mechanisms of memory and Proust’s evocation of it to explain the perennial popularity of the madeleine in the popular imagination.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2012). The cognitive realism of memory in Flaubert’s Madame Bovary. Modern Language Review, 107, 772-795.

Highlights the significance of memory in relation to cognitive dissonance in readers’ engagements with Flaubert’s eponymous heroine.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2010). Kafkaesque worlds in real time. Language and Literature, 19, 171-191.

Argues that we need to understand cognition – and vision and imagination in particular – as embodied and enactive to grasp the essence of the ‘Kafkaesque’ as it plays with readers’ experiences of space and time.


Book chapters:

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2018). Reading Kafka. In C. Duttlinger (Ed.), Franz Kafka in context (pp. 283-292). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Traces the history of professional ways of reading Kafka’s texts, arguing that despite their varied theoretical agendas, they have always been trying to answer the question current cognitive approaches make explicit: what makes reading (Kafka) feel like this?

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2017). How should we talk about reading experiences? Arguments and empirical evidence. In T. Koblížek (Ed.), Aesthetic illusion (pp. 237-271). New York: Bloomsbury.

Criticises the concept of aesthetic illusion using both theoretical considerations and an analysis of free-response data from my survey on reading habits and mental health with the charity Beat.

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2017). Feedback in reading and disordered eating. In M. Burke and E.T. Troscianko (Eds), Cognitive literary science: Dialogues between literature and cognition (pp. 169-194). New York: Oxford University Press.

Demonstrates, theoretically and empirically, the importance of feedback – and especially unstable positive feedback loops – for understanding both disordered eating and the interpretation of fiction.


Blog:

▪ Troscianko, E.T. (2009-present). A hunger artist.

Brings together personal and scientific perspectives on disordered eating for a readership of sufferers, their friends and families, and others, with 82 posts (including 11 chosen by PT editors as Essential Reads) to date. I engage in detailed dialogue, through blog comments and inquiry-form contact, with numerous readers on a near-daily basis – the blog has so far attracted over 1.7 million all-time views and over 1,500 comments.


Guest blog posts:

▪ The Early Career Blog (Oxford, Cambridge, and Imperial):

Guest series on resilience and academia:

  1. Resilience: Does academia complement or conflict with who you are? (2018)

▪ Durham Centre for Medical Humanities:

2018 International Health Humanities Consortium Conference, Stanford: A snapshot and two questions (2018)

How on earth will the medical humanities make you a better doctor? (2015)

▪ What Literature Knows About Your Mind (Cambridge University):

Thinking about Thinking with Literature (2015)

Prose or Prozac? (2014)

▪ Imperfect Cognitions (University of Birmingham) (2015), All that glitters…

▪ Women in German Studies ECR Blog (2015), Early-career creativity

▪ Beat news blog (2015), Bodies, minds, and words: A new collaboration


Podcasts:

▪ Eating Disorder Recovery Podcast (2016)

▪ New Books Network (New Books in Literature series), interview on Kafka’s cognitive realism (2016)

▪ TORCH Book at Lunchtime series, chair, Terence Cave’s Thinking with Literature (2016)

▪ TORCH Humanities and Science in Conversation series: Mental Health (2015)

▪ TORCH Book at Lunchtime series, Kafka’s Cognitive Realism (2014)